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BIS release batteries guidance on vehicle terminology

BIS have released a statement documenting changes to the terms “vehicle” and “electric vehicle”.

In order to maintain their commitment to continuously review the guidance, BIS have released a statement documenting changes to the terms “vehicle” and “electric vehicle”.

In the current guidance, reference is made to both golf buggies and powered trollies as examples in the classification of industrial and automotive batteries. The statement outlines that under new guidance these examples will no longer be mentioned in order to align the wording more closely with the Directive.

One of the main characteristics that determine whether a battery falls within an industrial classification is that it is used as a power source for an electric vehicle. The definition of vehicle has also been slightly amended to adhere more closely to the Oxford English Dictionary, as follows:

"A means of conveyance provided with wheels or runners and used for the carriage of persons or goods."

Classification of a battery as automotive requires that it is used for starting or ignition of the engine of a road-going vehicle. The regulations state that an electric vehicle uses electricity as a source of power for propulsion, hence its classification as an industrial rather that an automotive battery.

We can understand the reason for BIS clarifying the interpretation of a vehicle as there were clearly differing opinions across the industry. Their statement comprehensively defines golf trollies, which is good news for all.

The new guidance, which will no longer mention golf buggies or power trollies as they do not appear in the Directive, will take effect from the date that it is published.


Robbie Staniforth

Head of innovation and policy

Robbie is Head of policy and innovation at Ecosurety. Having spent the past few years building an intimate understanding of the industry’s policies and politics, he uses this knowledge to help shape new legislation and develop new services. He is a spokesperson for the company and regularly uses his influence to communicate the importance of environmental responsibility to external stakeholders.


Written by Robbie Staniforth Published 29/10/2013 Topics Compliance

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